Plätzchen, or The Art of Baking German Christmas Cookies

21 Nov

The furniture is in place, internet hooked up, and boxes unpacked (or almost…).  We have arrived in our new place just in time for Christmas.  With a brand new oven to break in, I have spent the weekend getting into the holiday spirit with some baking!

What exactly are Plätzchen?

Plätzchen simply translates in English to Christmas cookies.  They are a German holiday tradition, and they come in all different shapes and sizes. There are many different Plätzchen recipes out there.  Nuremberg is famous for its Lebkuchen, a type of gingerbread cookie.  Actually, nuts and spices are the basis for many Plätzchen recipes.  Even so, Germany takes the art of Christmas cookies far beyond basic ginger bread.

Where to find German Christmas cookies?

Plätzchen can be found everywhere.  Stands have popped up around town selling different kinds of cookies, and bakeries have added colorful packages of them to their counters.  Supermarkets have even been selling the industrial variety since as early as October.

However, if you’re like me and enjoy baking, the homemade variety is definitely the way to go! Recipes abound in cooking magazines, and holiday cookie cutters can be found in stores and markets.  I tried two basic recipes this weekend: Zimtsterne (cinnamon stars) and Vanillekipferln (vanilla cookies in a half moon/croissant shape).

Tips

Zimtsterne cookies have a meringue type icing, made from egg white and powdered sugar.  If you try these, the trick is to keep a constant eye on your oven.  The preparation time is fairly long, because you have to let the dough chill for 8 hours in the fridge, and then let the cookies dry overnight once you’ve painted the icing onto them.  However, cooking time is quite short, and if you leave your cookies too long, the beautiful white icing will quickly turn brown!  If you have a hot oven, you might need to reduce a recipe’s temperature and/or cooking time.

If you try making Vanillekipferln, be patient when shaping the dough.  It is fairly brittle and not always very easy to work with.  Also, the powdered sugar/vanilla bean coating tends to stick better if the cookies are still warm but not just out of the oven.  I’d suggest letting them sit about 5 minutes before coating them.

 

Homemade "Vanillekipferln"

 

 

Homemade "Zimtsterne"

 

 

Advertisements

One Response to “Plätzchen, or The Art of Baking German Christmas Cookies”

  1. Karl November 21, 2010 at 11:08 pm #

    wow !

    the cookies look good !!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: